Blog Posts in 2017

  • Kids Luau is June 17 at Cedar Knoll

    King’s Daughters pediatric practices are sponsoring a Kid’s Luau from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 17 at Cedar Knoll Pediatrics, 10650 U.S. Route 60 in Cannonsburg, near the Kyova Mall. Parents will be able to meet King’s Daughters pediatricians and providers; ask questions about immunizations; get information about health issues and concerns affecting children, and more. ...
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  • Welcome to Medicare is June 6

    King’s Daughters popular Welcome to Medicare program returns Tuesday, June 6 with a free diabetic foot screening and presentation by Jacob Taulbee of the State Health Insurance Program. The event will begin at 11:30 a.m. in the Health Education Center at King’s Daughters, which is located in the lower level of the Lexington Avenue Parking Garage. Podiatrist Matthew Ellsworth, DPM, will ...
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  • King's Daughters earns national recognition for stroke treatment

    King’s Daughters Medical Center has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Achievement Award with Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus. The award recognizes KDMC’s commitment to providing the most appropriate stroke treatment according to nationally recognized, research-driven guidelines based on the latest ...
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  • Ischemic stroke explained

    Ischemic stroke is the most commonly occurring type of stroke, affecting about 200,000 Americans annually. The word, ischemic, means an insufficient supply of blood to a part of the body caused by an obstruction. An ischemic stroke occurs when blood cannot get to the brain. There are two types of ischemic stroke: embolic and thrombotic. A stroke caused by a blood clot or a fragment of plaque that ...
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  • Volunteer opportunities available at River Cities Harvest

    So many Kentuckians don’t know where their next meal is coming from. Each year, more than 600,000 depend on food banks to feed their families. While nearly 16 percent of Kentuckians depend on outside agencies for help, the numbers are improving, according to a new report by Feeding America. The number of Kentuckians who are “food insecure” — lacking reliable access to a ...
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  • Program on atrial fibrillation is Tuesday at Kentucky Farmers Bank

    King’s Daughters, in conjunction with Kentucky Farmers Bank, will present “Understanding Atrial Fibrillation” with electrophysiologist Ola Khraisha, M.D., on Tuesday, May 23. The presentation will take place in the 2nd floor conference room of the Kentucky Farmers Bank, 6313 U.S. Route 60, Ashland. A free buffet lunch will be served beginning at 11:30 a.m., with the talk ...
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  • Exploring stroke types: Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Last week, we talked about Transient Ischemic Attacks, or “mini-stroke." This week, we’ll focus on hemorrhagic stroke. Only about 15 percent of all strokes are hemorrhagic, but they cause about 40 percent of all deaths from stroke. The word “hemorrhage” means the escape of blood from a ruptured blood vessel. When a hemorrhage happens in the brain, the blood pools, ...
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  • Vicki Cossett awarded Bev Coleman Nursing Excellence Award

    As part of Nurses Week, King's Daughters accepted nominations for the inaugural Bev Coleman Nursing Excellence Award, which recognizes a nurse who has exhibited the highest levels of nursing excellence and has positively influenced the nursing culture including: • Positivity in the face of adversity • Empathy • Grace • Selflessness Today, Vicki Cossett, a dedicated ...
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  • Variety of techniques used in minimally invasive surgery

    In minimally invasive surgery, surgeons use a variety of techniques to operate with less damage to the body than with open surgery. In general, minimally invasive surgery is associated with less pain, a shorter hospital stay and fewer complications. Laparoscopy — surgery done through one or more small incisions, using small tubes and tiny cameras and surgical instruments — was one of ...
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  • Understanding Tetralogy of Fallot

    Congenital Heart Disease is the most common severe abnormality occurring in the fetus. The incidence of CHD is about 50 per 1,000 live births. The majority of fetuses with CHD have no known risk factors. Diagnosing these problems during pregnancy allows physicians and nurses to provide more education, counseling and support to the expectant mother and improves outcomes. Recently, the public became ...
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  • TIA: The canary in the coal mine

    Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S. Every year, 795,000 people suffer a stroke. About 600,000 of these are first attacks, and 185,000 are recurrent attacks. Nearly three-quarters of all strokes occur in people over the age of 65. During May, national Stroke Awareness Month, we’ll be sharing information about stroke and things you can do to reduce your ...
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  • A new approach to cardiac catheterization

    For decades, cardiologists have performed cardiac catheterization by threading a guidewire and catheter through the femoral artery, the major blood vessel in the leg. This has worked well: the artery is large, generally straight and relatively easy to access. But there are some drawbacks: Most notably patients must lie flat on their backs for an extended period of time following the procedure. ...
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